#SamInHand — Cooking with Sam Adams Beer — Banner

I AM NOT A FOODIE: #SamInHand Has Me Cooking With Sam Adams Beer!

As a guy who rarely cooks, I’m guessing that God’s having none of that and making sure I can actually provide for my family.

Some time ago, I shared the story of my hatred for cooking, sure I’d avoid the kitchen for the rest of my earthbound years. But with daycare nipping hot at the heels of the East York Palmers, and with it the scheduling unpredictability that comes from a family with two working parents, I had to bite the bullet sometime!

So whaddya know — despite being loath for anything finding me in front of a stove, brands like Samuel Adams put their money where their mouth is (and product where mine is), challenging me to grab an apron and see what I can do to feed myself without calling the number for the local pizzeria — and yes, it is on my speed dial.

Everyone, for your viewing pleasure, I present — Cooking With Beer: Because it’s Not Just Good for Drinking!

CONTINUE READING: A story of beer-brined pork chops, complete with Sam Adams, confession and raccoons!

Hull Services x #RBCAmes

Helping Youth with Hull Services and #RBCAmes!

What would you do if someone gave you the resources to make a difference? Some would try to cure diseases, some would focus on developing countries, or perhaps donate it to a favourite cause.

Trevor Morgan, Vice President, New Line Skateparks
Trevor Morgan, Vice President, New Line Skateparks — Source: http://www.avenuecalgary.com/City-Life/Top-40-Under-40/Trevor-Morgan/

In the case of Trevor Morgan, Vice President of New Line Skateparks, it’s giving the youth of Calgary, Alberta an outlet and safe place that can give them the positive influences they need for their futures.

The Matthew Banister Memorial Skatepark is Trevor’s way to help youth avoid the fate that befell his friend.

CONTINUE READING: The tale of Matthew Banister and how it inspired Trevor Morgan to try and help today’s at-risk youth. PLUS, how YOU can help!

All right, STOP. Collaborate and LISTEN.

THE GREAT SOCIAL MEDIA STORY: All Right, STOP. Collaborate and LISTEN.

If you read my last post you’ll know that I’m at a crossroads with the blog, feeling like I’m going in circles when I try to produce amazing content. It’s not for a lack of ideas — my desk is like a mad scientist’s secret lab, with me tinkering about to perfectly combine these notes, scribbles and sketches into things the world’s never seen. No, rather one can have too many ideas, and what happens when you try to tackle them all at once and not having some patience and conquering it all naturally with a well-thought plan.

These are the musings of a man crawling from under the weight of a million ideas, trying to find the one that’ll buy him the time to handle all the others.

CONTINUE READING: Today’s post is all about COLLABORATION. Will you learn to work with others, or keep your ideas to yourself, never seeing them bear fruit?

Don't Call it a Comeback Title Image

THE GREAT SOCIAL MEDIA STORY: Don’t Call it a Comeback!!!

Another birthday in the bag and I’m long overdue for a solid blog post. Admittedly, part of my recent absence involved my two-week vacation from work and my choice to spend more time with my family, time stolen away by the 9-5 I work to keep him well.

But though all else seemed secondary for a while, with my gaze transfixed on the small adventures we’d have in Ottawa and Toronto, I’d never stay gone forever, the blog too much a part of me to abandon it without good reason.

Don't Call It A Comeback — Casey and Son at Hanlan's Point
I expected many moments like this in 2014, but maybe didn’t appreciate all the work that comes with ‘em.

I entered 2014 thinking I knew exactly where my blog was going next. I’d just had a kid less than two months before, eagerly writing on the brand-new fatherhood experience and everything I was learning from it. I’d written up The 2014 100, my annual list of 100 things I’d like to try doing through the year, looking more optimistic than my list did for The 2013 100 as I better understood who I was and what I wanted. Through either dumb luck or all the years of hard work paying off, I was lining up paid opportunities and access to plenty of product reviews — it felt like the year I could finally say I “made it”, one of Toronto’s bloggers making money for their craft, with the potential of calling blogging a “job”.

But the truth isn’t nearly as simple as that. Six months later, my posts are infrequent, my mind’s tired and I feel like my #BloggerLife’s more confused now than it was when the year began.

It might be time to take a look at my blogging and figure out what it is I’m trying to accomplish.

CONTINUE READING: A look at why I blog, what drives me, and what I need to do next to keep thriving.

Canadian National Comics Expo 2006 Convention Table

Getting it Write — A Blog Hop on Writing and Why I Do It!

In a world where I consider blogging far past its prime as we use photos, audio and video as the clearest ways to communicate a message, I still choose to write. “The writing’s on the wall,” you say, a smugness in your tone as you note the play on words, “You can make so much more money on YouTube!” But that’s not what it’s all about for me — when I write, I treat it like anything else I put together, carefully and methodically, much like I would when working on a detailed art piece, trying to get every little details just so to help my audience truly get inside my head.

Kelly Leaman BiSC Headshot
Writer. Photographer. Daydreamer. Blogger. Designer. Cat lady. Iowa girl. Jewelry addict. Baker. Recovering perfectionist. Stealer of french fries. Lover of pretty things and geeky humor.

Recently, my friend and fellow BiSC-uit Kelly Leaman of [Insert Clever Title Here] emailed me, seeing if I wanted to join a blog hop on writing. Much like the chain mail of days past, blog hops start with a blogger and an idea, tagging other bloggers to get their thoughts and so on.

In this particular exercise, we answered four questions on writing:

  1. What am I working on?
  2. How does my work/writing differ from others of its genre?
  3. Why do I write what I do?
  4. How does my writing process work?

Almost 12 years and over 2,000 posts later, I hope these answers give a little insight into why I keep blogging, and the things I’m planning next for my little corner of the Internet.

CONTINUE READING: Four questions. Four answers. For more insight into my mind, CLICK HERE!

I'm not a blogger, I just talk a lot.

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