TRY YOUR LUCK: Making Memories Aplenty with the FujiFilm FinePix XP120!

One of my roles as a parent is to provide a better life for my children than my parents could for me. And we’ve done okay so far—the older one’s already visited four countries, the younger carries a Bluetooth speaker around like it’s his own personal device, and with new toys coming in regularly, the world’s pretty much their oyster!

But it’s not all about the things you receive—I want to give my sons plenty of opportunities to develop themselves as well, and it turns out Fujifilm Canada presented a perfect opportunity to do it!

The FujiFilm FinePix XP120 — For When You Want to Teach Your Kids Life Skills Without Worrying About Them Breaking Stuff.

Just as many parents start their kids on piano at a young age, I wanted to give the boys early exposure to a skill I know well and introduce them to the world of photography.

I wish my first camera looked like this!

I remember getting my first camera around 12 years old, a little green toy camera that introduced me to the world of photography and the stories it held. And I wouldn’t know it then, but that’d take me down a 20-year path that’d teach me how to develop my film. Own more than 15 cameras as I continued expanding my skills. It’d even help me build it up as an integral part of my life as a blogger, expressing myself not only through words but meaningful visuals as well.

My boys—though still very young—already show an interest in the art, trying their hands at posing and storytelling to see how it unfolds on the LCD screen. I think they’d love to get more hands-on with equipment to mould their ideas into reality, but who in their right mind would trust a three-year-old with a camera? They’re fragile. They’re complicated. And they’re expensive. Sadly, all things considered, it looked like my boys need to wait years before they can handle one themselves.

Or do they?

The 2016 100 Wrap-Up, Part 3: The 28 Things Left Over

And we’re finally here—the 28 items that either just didn’t make the cut to come back after 2016, or got tabled for future Casey to handle somewhere down the line!

The more I do these, the more I realise I can’t do everything today, and so I work harder to focus on what’s in front of me so I can give myself the room to manage future challenges!

But hey—if there’s something on this list you think you can make happen sooner, feel free to let me know at palmer.casey@gmail.com and we’ll see what we can do!

Without further ado, here’s The 2016 100 Wrap-Up, Part 3: The 28 Items Left Over!


The 2016 100 Wrap-Up — What I MAY Do, But Not Necessarily in 2017

2) Win a vacation for my dry cleaner — One thing I’ve learned as a blogger is that while it’s all too easy to get high on yourself when you have successes, you also need to keep realistic. Though many great things have happened in my #BloggerLife so far, I don’t have the clout nor the contacts to conjure a vacation from thin air. Not yet, anyway. This is one I’ll pursue awhile, yet.

4) Take Eric to a sporting event so he can stop complaining about getting left from sporting events — After hitting a Toronto Argos game last year with a few buddies (and by association the Canada vs. Slovakia World Junior Hockey Championship game I was at just before the new year), I may have promised my buddy Eric that I’d take him to a game sometime. This would make the 2017 list, except I have no idea when I’ll find myself invited to a game next, so we’ll get back to this one eventually.

GIVEAWAY: DADDY’S GOT A BRAND NEW TOY — TELUS x The Lenovo Moto Z — Changing the Way We Smartphone!

“You need a Moto Z.”

— Casey Palmer to basically everyone he talks to, gushing over how awesome his phone is.

In the beginning, I wondered what was so cool about a phone without a headphone jack.

When Apple announced the iPhone 7 in September, people lost their minds—what’s the point of having a device with access to millions of songs if you can’t listen to them? Buy wireless earbuds, they said. Change up the charging port with a dongle, they said.  It took a feature everyone knew so well and did away with it—for a number of good reasons, mind you (waterproofing and Bluetooth redundancy to name a couple), but for all the negative hoopla they got about it, people failed to note two things:

  1. We must embrace better methods to make better phones, and
  2. That Apple didn’t do it first.