Destroy and Rebuild

Last updated on March 30th, 2021 at 09:23 am

I know many bloggers who make their reputation in a specific genre based more on their interaction with people via Twitter and at parties than by actually writing blog posts.

A friend who doesn’t fit this scenario at all has a saying… ‘I’m not a blogger I just talk a lot’. What’s strange about that saying is that he best describes the so-called ‘famous bloggers’ more than he describes himself. The dude actually has good content and close to 700 blog posts over nearly five years!

…[Casey] lives the dream family- and job-wise but still finds time to fork out nearly a blog a week. I’m pretty sure he’s Clark Kent by day and the Superman of the blogs by night. But as his quote goes, he obviously feels that the words aren’t enough.”

— Eric Freedlander, “When the Words Weren’t Enough We Had Milk

It’s been half a decade since my buddy Eric wrote these words about me, but they’ve only grown truer over time. The fam’s grown bigger. The job more complex. I’m still churning content on the daily.

But though the hustle’s still real, a lot changes over time—let me tell you a bit about what my #BloggerLife’s like today.

DESTROY | Blogging Ain’t Like It Used To Be.

It’s been a long time since what I do was “just blogging”. I’ve obsessively raised the bar time and time again since the turn of the decade, seeing the brand evolve into something unrecognisable from its beginnings. I swapped consistency out for quality and socialising out for scribing. I needed to see how high I could reach before I closed this chapter of my life.

But this gig ain’t easy.

DESTROY | You Can’t Do the Same Thing Forever and Expect the Same Results.

Anthony Sistilli put it well when he shared his story of mastering StarCraft II on Medium. His take on his journey was this:

“Breaking my plateaus felt like rebuilding myself from scratch… [t]here were cracks in my foundation, gaps in my understanding, and a lot of things that needed refining. I had to reinvent the way I played. In order to go higher I had to break it down and rebuild it up again.”

When you stop feeling like you’re growing, it’s time for some serious self-evaluation, and figure out whether you’re doing the things you should be doing.

#100HappyDays—Day 16—Pink Shirt Day—Casey Palmer

And Anthony’s right—there are so many of us who’ve been at this since forever, but we haven’t made it big because we haven’t tapped into what makes each of us unique and stand out from the crowd.

The Problems With Making Webcomics

Last updated on November 8th, 2020 at 12:56 am

For anyone who’s only known me for a little while, I’ve had a dream for the longest time—to put a comic story together from beginning to end.

For the past decade, I’ve chipped away at an idea I’ve had for a comic named Fish ‘n’ Chimps—I even went as far as working on the webcomic from 2003-2006 and making print comics to sell at comic conventions for a number of years.

But that was like diving into the deep end without checking to make sure that the pool was filled.

Since then, I’ve been chipping away at this idea of mine, changing it from an idea for a gag comic from someone just exiting their teenage years to a storyline of a far grander scale, reflecting everything that I’ve learned in the last decade. Character sketches have given way to storylines; ideas scrawled on napkins and scrap paper found their way into what’s starting to resemble a script.

But as they say—the devil’s in the details. The longer I work at the idea, the more complex it becomes and the higher my standards rise. What started as an unfocused idea has grown with startling clarity—the only problem now will be finding the time to make it a reality.

With a subway delay giving me an extended commute on my way home from my cosmic twin’s housewarming party, I sketched this out from ideas I have for later into the storyline—I guess all that I need to do now is start actually drawing the comic so I can get there.

The second logo for Casey Palmer, Canadian Dad