Tales from the 2.9 — The Black Canadians Sharing their Stories in a Digital Age — Vol. 2 #6, Samantha Kemp-Jackson, Writer, Public Speaker, Media Spokesperson, Multiple Mayhem Mamma

I’ve faced a number of issues as a Black Canadian, yes, but those suffered by Black Canadian women are on a different level entirely.

It’s no coincidence that the Women’s March happened the day after Donald Trump was inaugurated as President — his election campaign was awash with sexist sentiment leaving women feeling more objectified than ever, so when Samantha Kemp-Jackson echoed these feelings in her submission, it was sadly just another example that women of colour have dealt with entirely too long.

Compiling Tales from the 2.9 gives me hope that with enough mindful action, we can find ways to work past the shackles that bind us, but who of us will commit to taking the first steps on that very long road ahead?

Hopefully, this post will inspire you to do just that!

Until tomorrow,

–case p.


What does being Black Canadian mean to you?

To me, being a Black Canadian means many things. It is a daily exercise in intersectionality, with my skin colour being the constant. I am a Black Canadian, but I am also a woman. The combination of both of these elements has led to many experiences, both positive and less-than-positive that are sadly, not uncommon for Black women in general.

I think we (People of Colour) have all experienced some standard questions: “Where are you from?” or “No, where are you REALLY from,” which underscores that while we may be a diverse society, we still have a way to go in terms of the greater public accepting minorities as “real Canadians.”

That said, it’s not all doom and gloom. Being a Black Canadian, and a Canadian in general, has allowed me to be appreciated by many who embrace multiculturalism, and who are open and welcoming to all. As well, I appreciate the many cultures and the diversity that I experience on a day-to-day basis. Living in Toronto, I’ve been spoiled in that every day, it’s the norm to see, speak with and interact with so many Canadians of diverse backgrounds and ethnicities. Being a Black Canadian means walking through life with many different lenses and experiencing the society from a unique and interesting perspective.