Tales from the 2.9 — The Black Canadians Sharing their Stories in a Digital Age — Vol. 2 #15, Lian “Reese” Wright, Blogger, Reese Speaks

One point I’ve made a number of times while running this year’s Tales from the 2.9 is that I don’t wake up each morning with my Blackness at the forefront of my mind. Am I aware of it? Obviously—it’s an integral part of my identity of the beliefs, behaviours and biases I have today. But I don’t let it define me—my race is part of the whole that is Casey Palmer, and that’s something I believe today’s contributor would firmly agree with.

I first came across Lian “Reese” Wright when I put 2016’s series together, and she’s staunchly supported the series since. As mentioned last year, parent bloggers of colour aren’t that prevalent—especially not in Canada—so when we can learn from each other, it’s truly a beautiful thing.

Without further ado, please enjoy some of Reese’s thoughts on what her Black Canadian identity means to her, and I’ll be right back tomorrow with another Tale from the 2.9!

Until then,

–case p.


Tales from the 2.9 — Lian 'Reese' WrightWhat does being Black Canadian mean to you?

For me, being a Black Canadian means so many things. I feel unique because I am usually the only Black Canadian in a group of people. I feel proud because of the all of the accomplishments Black Canadians have achieved and continue to pursue. For me, being Black Canadian also means that I have to overcome challenges put in front of me to be successful and to change what others perceive of me due to the stereotypes that are believed about our community.

The 2017 100 — It’s Not WHAT You Do, It’s How You DO It.

Unless my life sees some major changes this year, 2017 may mark the last list of 100!

It’s January 13th—I’ve spent nearly two weeks of my new year agonising over 100 items that matter enough to hit a list of goals and aspirations for the year ahead. And that’s a key difference from the lists that came before it.

Before it was a task list—I’d look around at everything that needed doing and jot it down, because my life would obviously be better with them out of the way.

But task lists aren’t inspiring. They’re not motivational. As a creative, that’s like dropping a pile of 100 things I dread on my lap and nagging myself to get ’em done by the year’s end.

Once I realised what I was doing to myself, so much so that I just went through my least successful year yet for my list, I knew I needed to make a change for 2017.

The 2017 100 — It's Not WHAT You Do, It's How You DO It. — New Year, New Perspective

I’m particularly proud of the list I’ve put together for The 2017 100. I didn’t take any shortcuts—I wrote out 100 things that’d help me live the life I’d like to lead and prove instrumental along the path there. Rather than hurriedly scrawl out a list I’d likely ignore ’til December, I wrote one that I’d happily check off, knowing that each accomplishment would take me a step closer to a far better 2018. I feel like I’m finally getting it right this time, and I hope that shines through as you give it a look for yourself!

But that’s enough of my chatter—I’ve already made you wait long enough. Here for your consideration is The 2017 100—because it’s not what you do… it’s how you do it!

GIVEAWAY POST: Have the Time of Your Life with Feld Entertainment’s Marvel Universe LIVE!

I mentioned it last week — parenting was just different in the ’80s. We didn’t know what we didn’t know — we knew you’d likely eventually need glasses if you sat too close to the TV screen, but all the ailments and disorders we’re all too prepared to label children with today were virtually unheard of. And without the fear of social and developmental disorders, my childhood schedule was peppered with Saturday morning cartoons; marathon sessions hammering away at video games*; and maybe most importantly, as I grew older and understood more, I spent tons of my time at school, home and the local shopping mall reading, talking and immersing myself in comic books, learning much of what I know about storytelling now through their pages.

*Seriously, ask my Dad sometime about how many TVs we burned through. One of his favourite rants.

Even so, as you grow older your tastes change — I moved from the likes of Spider-Man and Batman to more mature titles like Preacher, Hellboy and Transmetropolitan, always looking for amazing visual narratives that’d succeed at keeping my attention.

Which is why in ways it feels like I’m coming full circle with Marvel Universe LIVE!