Casey Palmer and The Globe and Mail do Father’s Day!

It’s been a busy summer, y’all.

After time spent everywhere from the Toronto Islands and Lake Simcoe all the way to Mexico, the juggling act between the #BloggerLife, the family, and a pile of paperwork that’s multiplying faster than a herd of rabbits has been an intense one.

So much so that I’ve been negligent in doing all I can to share news about the brand with the audience I’ve worked so hard to build!

For Father’s Day, our national paper The Globe and Mail got in touch to ask me some questions on fatherhood as a Canadian who writes about what it’s like as a Dad today. In the answers below, you’ll see I took the task very seriously, as the way I’m raising my boys is super-intentional, and I want them wanting for nothing in their lives—whether physically, mentally or emotionally—by the time they’re my age.

I enjoyed writing the responses below, and I hope you find a little of yourself in them, too!


Casey Palmer — Toronto-based blogger at CaseyPalmer.com

10 Links You Should Click

One of my bad habits is racking numerous open tabs up in my browsers. It’s something I’ve tried to curb in The 2014 100, but it still creeps in if left unchecked.

After chatting with a friend who misses the short posts I used to put out with 100 Happy Days, she got me thinking on what I could put out that was short and sweet but could still be valuable to my readers.

So in that spirit, here’s 10 Links You Should Click, a (maybe weekly) look at the stuff I come across and think you should check out. It could be things I want to make or do, or maybe stuff I just discovered that made me pause.

May these links titillate and thrill you, excite and entice you — and give me a reason to do this again!

A radical pessimist’s guide to the next 10 years – The Globe and Mail

Words to live by

A glossary of new terms for a messed-up future

The iconic writer reveals the shape of things to come, with 45 tips for survival and a matching glossary of the new words you’ll need to talk about your messed-up future.

1) It’s going to get worse

No silver linings and no lemonade. The elevator only goes down. The bright note is that the elevator will, at some point, stop.

2) The future isn’t going to feel futuristic

It’s simply going to feel weird and out-of-control-ish, the way it does now, because too many things are changing too quickly. The reason the future feels odd is because of its unpredictability. If the future didn’t feel weirdly unexpected, then something would be wrong.

3) The future is going to happen no matter what we do. The future will feel even faster than it does now

The next sets of triumphing technologies are going to happen, no matter who invents them or where or how. Not that technology alone dictates the future, but in the end it always leaves its mark. The only unknown factor is the pace at which new technologies will appear. This technological determinism, with its sense of constantly awaiting a new era-changing technology every day, is one of the hallmarks of the next decade.